Coornhoop

Centre for Conflict ResolutionThe Centre for Conflict Resolution (CCR), Cape Town, South Africa's offices are located at the Coornhoop complex, comprising a total of 663 square metres.

"Coornhoop" is an historic 17th century farmhouse situated at 2 Dixton Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa, and traces its history to between February 1657 and February 1658, when the Dutch Commander, Jan van Riebeeck, granted land parcels to 14 "free burghers".

The origin of the name "Coornhoop" comes from the fact that the free burghers were expected to devote themselves to the growing of "coorn" which is the Dutch word for "wheat".

The Coornhoop dovecot links two other buildings, originally farm buildings, which were later converted to dwellings in 1965. The front elevation of the dovecot is a unique feature in classical Cape architecture.

Centre for Conflict ResolutionCoornhoop makes an important contribution to local character and identity, and was proclaimed a national monument in 1966. CCR hosts meetings attracting both national and international personalities, which gives the building exposure as a historic site.

CCR's Coornhoop Complex Preservation Project aims to preserve the natural heritage of this historic site, and thereby extend its physical life, while also protecting the site and minimising disruption to operations. The project, through a strategy of structural refurbishment and continued maintenance, seeks to repair the weathered conditions and preserve the character-defining aspects of the buildings and gardens.